Newsletter

Wax Moth

There are currently two known species of wax moth that occupy and damage honey bee colonies. Each one has four stages of development: egg; larva; pupa; and adult. The greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, is the more destructive and common pest whilst the lesser wax moth, Achroia grisella is both less prevalent and less destructive. Wax moth infestations are […]

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Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus

Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV)-infected bees are characteristically ‘shiny and black’. These bees in infected hives are often found isolated, motionless and/or shaking on the top bars. When the colony is smoked they do not tend to move down between the frames as the other ‘normal’ bees do. Abdomens may also be distended and the wings […]

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Varroa Mites

Varroa destructor (Anderson and Truman) previously described as Varroa jacobsoni (Oud) is a parasitic mite of adult bees and brood. In the past hundred years or so it has become the most serious pest of Western honeybees across the globe, particularly for the European honey bee Apis mellifera which lacks natural defences to be able to deal with the mite […]

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Nosema

There are no outward symptoms of the disease. Dysentery is often seen in association with N. apis infections; this may be seen as ‘spotting’ at the hive entrance or across the frames. The dysentery is not caused by the pathogen, but as a consequence of infection and can be exacerbated during periods of prolonged confinement during inclement […]

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Amoeba Disease

The causative agent of this infection is the organism Malpighamoeba mellificae. There are no outward symptoms of the infection and a positive diagnosis of M. mellificae can only be made by microscopic examination to identify the amoebic cysts. It has been suggested that infections of M. mellificae are associated with spring dwindling, dysentery and shortening the lifespan of infected bees. […]

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Foulbrood

American foulbrood (AFB) and European foulbrood (EFB), despite their names, both occur in the UK and both can lead to the death of infected colonies. Both foulbroods are statutory notifiable diseases and therefore, beekeepers are legally obligated to report any suspected diseased colonies under the Bee Diseases and Pests Control Order 2006 (as amended). Causes AFB […]

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Tropilaelaps Mites

There are currently four species of Tropilaelaps mites. Of these only two (Tropilaelaps clareae and Tropilaelaps mercedesae) are considered serious mite threats to the Western honey bee Apis mellifera(Anderson and Morgan, 2007).  T. clareae and is already an economically important pest throughout Asia with the newly characterised T. mercedesae was widely spread, and was found on Apis mellifera in regions well outside its native range. In coming years […]

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