Newsletter

When Beekeeping clashes with Soy Farming in Mexico

An article with superb pictures by Nadia Shira Cohen which can be found via: https://wepresent.wetransfer.com/story/nadia-shira-cohen-world-press-photo-2019/ For centuries, the Mayan beekeepers of the Yucatan Peninsula have been one of the largest producers of honey in the world. But in 2011, the Mexican government started encouraging farmers to grow soy beans, offering generous subsidies to those who did. […]

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The value of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Bees’s stomachs and honey for human medicine

Picture: Lactic Acid Bacteria For centuries honey has been used as a folk medicine for the treatment of upper respiratory tract and wound infections, and even in modern hospitals, where honey is used on wound dressings. Many of its antimicrobial characteristics have been recognised but there are still unknown substances that contribute to this activity. […]

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Stronger pesticide regulations likely needed to protect all bee species, say studies

Picture: Wild Bee (Credit: Nigel Raine) esticide regulations designed to protect honeybees fail to account for potential health threats posed by agrochemicals to the full diversity of bee species that are even more important pollinators of food crops and other plants, say three new international papers co-authored by University of Guelph biologists. As the global […]

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A new class of insecticide—’can have a negative impact on the reproductive output of bumblebee colonies’

A new class of pesticides positioned to replace neonicotinoids may be just as harmful to crop-pollinating bees, researchers cautioned Wednesday. In experiments, the ability of bumblebees to reproduce, and the rate at which their colonies grow, were both compromised by the new sulfoximine-based insecticides, they reported in the journal Nature. Colonies exposed to low doses of […]

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The more pesticides bees eat, the more they like them

Picture: Lilla Frerichs Bumblebees acquire a taste for pesticide-laced food as they become more exposed to it, a behaviour showing possible symptoms of addiction. This study of bumblebee behaviour indicates that the risk of pesticide-contaminated food entering bee colonies may be higher than previously thought, which can have impacts on colony reproductive success. In research published today […]

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Study uncovers new link between neonicotinoid pesticide exposure and bumblebee decline

PhD student Melissa Mobley and Robert Gegear, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), examine bumblebees that have been fed small doses of a neonicotinoid pesticide as part of a study of the effects of the compounds on the long-term stability and survival of bee populations. Credit: Worcester Polytechnic Institute Read […]

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Improved regulation needed as pesticides found to affect genes in bees

Bumble Bee Colony Scientists are urging for improved regulation on pesticides after finding that they affect genes in bumblebees, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London in collaboration with Imperial College London. For the first time, researchers applied a biomedically inspired approach to examine changes in the 12,000 genes that make up […]

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Scientists from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered bee venom can kill the HIV virus…

  Scientists from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered bee venom can kill the HIV virus without harming the body. Bees could hold the key to preventing HIV transmission. Researchers have discovered that bee venom kills the virus while leaving body cells unharmed, which could lead to an anti-HIV vaginal gel […]

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France becomes first country in Europe to ban all five pesticides killing bees

France will take a radical step towards protecting its dwindling bee population on Saturday by becoming the first country in Europe to ban all five pesticides researchers believe are killing off the insects. The move to ban the five so-called neonicotinoids has been hailed by beekeepers and environmentalists, but cereal and sugar beet farmers warn it could leave […]

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World’s largest bee, missing for 38 years, found alive in Indonesia

As long as an adult thumb, with jaws like a stag beetle and four times larger than a honeybee, Wallace’s giant bee is not exactly inconspicuous. But after going missing, feared extinct, for 38 years, the world’s largest bee has been rediscovered alive on the Indonesian islands of the North Moluccas. Click on the image […]

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