Newsletter

Rare Australian bee found after 100 years

Rare bee found after 100 years by Flinders University Pharohylaeus lactiferus (Colletidae: Hylaeinae). Credit: James Dorey Photography A widespread field search for a rare Australian native bee not recorded for almost a century has found it’s been there all along—but is probably under increasing pressure to survive. Only six individual were ever found, with the last […]

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ARS scientists probe pollinator survival strategies

ARS Scientists Probe Pollinator Survival Strategies 06/23/2020 View as a webpage ARS News Service ARS Scientists Probe Pollinator Survival Strategies For media inquiries contact: Dennis O’Brien, 301-504-1624 June 23, 2020 Fargo, North Dakota, June 23 — Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have shed new light this spring on strategies used to ensure the survival of two very […]

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Major Honey Bee Health Problem with Particular Emphasis to Anti-Varroa Investigation of Propolis in Toke-Kutaye District, Ethiopia

American-Eurasian Journal of Scientific Research 11 (5): 320-331, 2016 ISSN 1818-6785 © IDOSI Publications, 2016 DOI: 10.5829/idosi.aejsr.2016.11.5.10418 Corresponding Author: Shimelis Mengistu, Haramaya University, College of Veterinary Medicine, P.O.Box: 138 Dire Dawa, Ethiopia. 320 Major Honey Bee Health Problem with Particular Emphasis to Anti-Varroa Investigation of Propolis in Toke-Kutaye District, Ethiopia Shimelis Mengistu, Yared Kebede and […]

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British Bee Veterinary Association – BSAVA Satellite Meeting

Wednesday 1st April 2020 ICC, Birmingham This will be the last pre-congress meeting in Birmingham, before the move to Manchester. The schedule outline is below; registration & coffee available from 9.30am, with the first speaker at 10am.   Excellent speakers from several different backgrounds and topics that will interest everyone. Guest speakers include Nicolas Vidal-Naquet, the […]

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Vomiting bumblebees show that sweeter is not necessarily better

Animal pollinators support the production of three-quarters of the world’s food crops, and many flowers produce nectar to reward the pollinators. A new study using bumblebees has found that the sweetest nectar is not necessarily the best: too much sugar slows down the bees. The results will inform breeding efforts to make crops more attractive […]

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